Post apocalyptic larp is becoming increasingly popular. That’s great. But what happens if you want to run a game where you can define, the start of apocalypse in detail?. For a zombie larp you could refer to many books, films and TV shows that exist for inspiration. If you want to talk about the end of world via war there is no end of real and imagined resources to draw on.

But lets say you want to impose the same end of the world that the dinosaurs faced on mankind; or perhaps a prelude to alien invasion.

Well fear not – there is a web page for this and you can find it at

http://34.201.137.35/ImpactEarth

 

Allow me to explain what this is.

It is a tool for looking at the results of impact by meteor, asteroid and comet on the Earth. You define the point of impact (its horribly good fun to pick a city and visit all kinds of impact on it). You can also define the size, speed and composition of the impacting body. Since we’re not all space scientists there are examples to help you to define all of these variables in a reasonable manner.

Once you’ve popped these in you’ll get a Bing Map and plotted onto it you can select effects like crater size, airblast diameter, size of the resulting fireball or area effected by seismic shock. This lets you easily figure out not just the scale of the disaster but also what you might have seen or felt at the time of impact, depending on where you were.

This all makes for good storytelling and character development.

Since its easy to use you can use it as a tool to help players develop their characters. They can answer questions about which relatives and friends would have been killed, and who may still be wandering a devastated earth.

In case you’re wondering how accurate it is I’ll just mention who’s behind Earth Impact. Its Imperial College London and Purdue University. I’ll take their data as being worth playing with.

So next time you feel the need to end the Earth, consider impacts. Be it one big asteroid squishing us or marauding aliens using space rubble as shotgun shells, you’ll at least be able to say what happened.

 

 

The image used for this post is BENNU’S JOURNEY – Early Earth  and its via the NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab Flickr Account. Click here to see the image and its licence.

 

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